February 2010 Archives

During a 2006 Monash postgraduate class on intelligence analysis our adviser made several observations on how the Australian Security Intelligence Agency (ASIO) is misrepresented and misunderstood. The 'S' stood for domestic security not secrecy. ASIO had an accountability and audit regime at multiple levels: legislative limits, the Treasury budget process, appeals processes, external audits and supply contract review, and reporting to the public and to bipartisan government committees. Australia's intelligence resources were mo stly deployed in military agencies for signals intelligence. Finally, media coverage of ASIO rarely evolves to the sophistication seen in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Bernard Keane's Crikey article 'The Answer is ASIO' (24th February 2010) risks continuing this trend in media coverage of intelligence issues. I want to illustrate below how Keane's own arguments can be interpreted as having their own "deeply-flawed logic" in his accusations of Labor's "security propaganda."
Heidegger, Martin (1996/1927) Being and Time: A Translation of Sein und Zeit.Trans. Joan Stambaugh. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Staumbaugh's 1996 translation is clearer to read than Macquarrie and Robinson's 1962 original, although it is helpful to have both for comparison. Sein und Zeit influenced existentialist, phenomenological, deconstruction and hermeneutic philosophy, and spans a bridge to pivotal later work by Hans-Georg Gadamer (Truth and Method), Alain Badiou (Being and Event; Logic of Worlds), and Paul Ricoeur (Time and Narrative).

This opens up some potential 'correspondences' to compare Heidegger and Gurdjieff's philosophies worth further exploration. Sein und Zeit may be Heidegger's 'legominism'; Heidegger's hermeneutic method an attempt to recover the 'I'; Dasein an awareness of Time as Gurdjieff's 'Merciless Heropass'; and Heidegger's 'hermeneutics of suspicion' broadly similar to Gurdjieff's 'Way of Golgotha' (during the First World War and the 1917 Russian Revolution), in that both are death-aware orientations to personal conscience. Heidegger's perspectives in Sein und Zeit about angst, falling into inauthenticity, and tradition's role in cultural transmission are similar to Gurdjieff's arguments. Finally, Sein und Zeit is about Aletheia in the sense of 'unconcealment' of being-in-life.


Faye, Emmanuel (2009) Heidegger:The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy in Light of the Unpublished Seminars of 1933-1935. Trans. Michael B. Smith. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Faye's book ignited controversy during its 2005 publication in France. Smith's translation has done so again, in The Chronicle of Higher Education. Faye makes three main arguments. (1) Heidegger embraced Nazi metaphysics in the late 1920s before he became Rector of Freiburg University, and this influence is clear in his 1933-35 seminars. (2) Heidegger's Nazism has influenced hermeneutics, postmodernists, and radical ecologists, who may be susceptible to proto-N. ideas. (3) Heidegger's political beliefs mean that he should be banished as a philosopher from university courses, and censored in libraries.

For many reviewers, Faye's contribution has been to highlight the archival sources in (1), although others claim Faye has misrepresented Heidegger's ideas to advance his arguments. (2) and (3) have ignited the debate: Who has Heidegger influenced over time, and to what effect? Under what conditions can knowledge creation be separated from its sociopolitical contexts, particularly when these contexts may change? What should be the fate of philosophers who may be brilliant in one sphere, but taint their reputation in other areas? Is it possible to be influenced subtly by 'evil' ideas, and how would we be ethically self-aware enough to know?

Faye's book is best read as an 'active exercise' with these issues in mind, issues that highlight Lethe as the opposite of Aletheia: how knowledge may be de-manifested, fragmented or (willfully) forgotten over time. A comparison of Heiddeger's period as Rector of Freiburg University with Gurdjieff's Paris groups raises some intriguing questions about Aletheia and ethical self-awareness in the midst of revolution, war and societal conflict. On the Paris groups, see the Gurdjieff group transcripts in William Patrick Patterson's Voices in the Dark: Esoteric, Occult, & Secular Voices in Nazi-Occupied Paris (Fairfax CA: Arete Communications, 2000).


De Salzmann, Jeanne. (2010) The Reality of Being: The Fourth Way of Gurdjieff. Boston: Shambhala Press.

De Salzmann (1889-1990) was the closest pupil of Gurdjieff's during his Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Fontainebleu, and during the later Paris period in World War II. She was pivotal to the Gurdjieff Foundation, to the transmission of the Movements, and to Peter Brook's film adaptation of Meetings With Remarkable Men (1979). Her publicly available writings have a directness of presence that differs from most other sources, the exceptions being Uspenskii's In Search of the Miraculous (New York: Harcourt, 1949) and John Pentland's Exchanges Within (New York: Continuum Publishing Company, 1997). This book compiled from De Salmann's 40 years of private notes promises to be a watershed moment in the Gurdjieff Work.


Tamdgidi, Mohammad H. (2009) Gurdjieff and Hypnosis: A Hermeneutic Study. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Robert Fripp's DGM diary for 3rd February 2010 alerted me to Tamdgidi's study, which has an introductory essay by noted Gurdjieff Work scholar J. Walter Driscoll. Tamdgidi contends that Gurdjieff's expertise as a hypnotist is essential to understand his relationship with students, and the deep structure of his books, especially the 'legominism' Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson (New York: Harcourt, 1950). In doing so, Tamdgidi demonstrates the methodological value of hermeneutics to interpret Gurdjieff's texts and to reconstruct the hints and 'fragments' into a coherent whole. This book reveals some of the 'mesoteric' ideas on the transcultural sources of Gurdjieff's cosmology, the appropriate use of friction in the teacher-student relationship, and the hypnotic structure of many occult ideas. Tamdgidi's analysis however has some broader implications about the performative nature of Uttering a Word, and why the Task and Curse of a Magus involves a paradigmatic shift or conceptual distance.

The Double

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Don Webb writes: '1. There is a cheap out-of-print mystery novel by Don Webb with 24 chapters, each one keyed to a Rune. Buy it. Heck have a book club. It is called The Double.'

Anyone have a copy of The Sarandib Revelations?

Or an Austin flyer for Zandor Sinestro's Circus of Terror?

Or know the Secret of the Brotherhood of Travelers?

The Double 1.jpg The Double 2.jpg

Dr. Michael A. Aquino once posed a central question of Setian philosophy to me. Rephrased from memory, it was something like: 'Why is it that Earth has only one species which has the self-aware consciousness to create civilization, symbolic systems, and other complex manifestations? Why not two or more? What would it be like if there was more than one species?' In this email exchange Dr. Aquino did acknowledge research into ape and dolphin communication, which perhaps has significance for Lilith Aquino's Utterance of Arkte. I pose this as a philosophical, existential dilemma, and not as a position of species infallibility. Within the Temple of Set, Dr. Aquino and others referred to this self-aware consciousness as the Gift of Set. Category 17 of the TS Reading List explored this in more detail, in the following categories.

Don Webb's Edred.net essay 'Concerning Words' (publicly released 16th February 2010) synthesizes two decades of reflection on several initiatory, metaphysical and cosmological philosophies, drawing on Plato, Chaldean theurgy, Crowleyan Thelema and Setian metaphysics. His focus is on the core Words that encapsulate these philosophies, the equivalent in these traditions of Thomas Kuhn's 'paradigms' used in philosophy of science to describe conceptual revolutions.

This post briefly discusses some lessons that LHP and Rune-Gild practitioners can learn from the Graeco-Armenian magus George Gurdjieff and the orthodox Gurdjieff Foundation, based in New York.


This personal interpretation remanifests a series of email dialogues with Vesa Itti, and with Petri Laakso in late 1997-early 1998 around the time of his IV* Recognition in the Temple of Set. In a follow-up entry I will discuss some of the limitations and criticisms.


I don't speak for the Foundation, the Temple, or the Gild, just myself.

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This page is an archive of entries from February 2010 listed from newest to oldest.

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